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Boosting health outcomes in South East Queensland

Boosting health outcomes in South East Queensland

Untitled-design.pngThe first recipient of the inaugural Springfield Health City Research Grant was announced in a new initiative designed to meet the growing healthcare needs of people living in the rapidly-growing region.

The grants are funded by a Springfield City Group donation to Mater Foundation and will drive innovative medical research and clinical services to improve healthcare.

Mater researcher Associate Professor Sumaira Hasnain has been awarded $100,000 for a study into more efficient treatments for Crohn’s disease and other inflammatory gut and bowel conditions.

“Inflammatory gut disease is a young person’s condition, usually affecting peopled aged from 5 – 49 years,” Assoc Prof Hasnain said.

“With the median age of people in Greater Springfield sitting at 30, and a large population of young families in the area, this research will directly benefit people living in this region.”

With 1 in every 250 Australians affected by inflammatory gut disease, up to 125 people living in Greater Springfield would be impacted by the condition.

Assoc Prof Hasnain’s research, Achieving Healing in Gut Inflammatory Disease, will focus on finding new solutions for patients who do not respond to current treatments.

Mater Foundation Executive Director Andrew Thomas said the Springfield Health City Research Grants would enable Mater to continue to grow and develop innovative services in the region.

“These grants will lead to cutting-edge, evidence-based health services that will directly benefit the people of Springfield through improved research and healthcare services,” Mr Thomas said.

“Mater Foundation believes everyone deserves access to the best possible healthcare and the Springfield Health City Research Grants help us realise this goal.”

The State Government recently announced a partnership that will see an expansion of Mater Private Hospital Springfield, located in the 52-hectare Health City Springfield Central precinct, to include a new Emergency Centre, Intensive Care Unit, maternity services and 139 extra hospital beds.

In addition, Springfield City Group last week revealed plans for an innovative medicines precinct that will help develop Queensland’s knowledge workers, increase new manufacturing capability and provide local jobs.

Springfield City Group Managing Director Raynuha Sinnathamby said health was a cornerstone of the master-planned community and the research grants would ensure people living and working in the region had access to the latest treatments and services.

“By supporting world-leading health research at Mater, we can reach our goal of developing a hub for innovative and contemporary evidence-based healthcare services at Springfield,” she said.